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Gail Evans, President Johnson's Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity.


Gail Evans

  • Author, "Play Like A Man Win Like A Woman"
  • CNN News Executive
  • President Johnson's White House Staff
  • Professional Speaker
Topics:
  • Play Like A Man, Win Like A Women
  • Playing to Change
Gail Evans is the best selling author of "Play Like A Man Win Like A Woman", an informative business guide to the secrets men know about success that women need to learn. The book was listed for several months on the New York Times, Business Week, and Wall Street Journal's bestseller lists. Play Like A Man, Win Like A Woman has been translated into 18 languages and has been a bestseller around the world. She has appeared in recent years on outlets such as, NBC's The Today Show, USA Today, the Larry King Live Show, and the New York Times to name a few. Her latest book, She Wins, You Win" was published in May of 2003.

Evans' career is vast, beginning in government and culminating as the Executive Vice President of CNN. Evans began working with CNN at its inception in 1980 and was promoted to Executive Vice President for CNN in 1996. In September 2000, Evans was named to Executive Vice President of Domestic Networks for the CNN Newsgroup. She was responsible for program and talent development of all domestic networks overseeing national and international talk shows and the Network Guest Bookings Department, which schedules about 25,000 guests each year. She served as a member of the CNN Executive Committee and was chairperson of the CNN programming task force. In addition, Evans developed some of CNN's most popular programs. Evans retired from CNN in the summer of 2001.

Evans began her career in the early 1960s, working on a number of congressional staffs. She worked at the White House in the Office of the Special Counsel to the President during the Lyndon B. Johnson Administration and was instrumental in the creation of the president's Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity and the 1966 Civil Rights Act. During the late 1960s, Evans lived in Moscow with her husband, who was then Moscow bureau chief for CBS News. After returning to the United States in 1970, she was a founding partner of Global Research Services, an Atlanta-based research and marketing firm.

Evans is active in numerous Atlanta and Georgia charities and served for two years as the chairperson of the Georgia Endowment for the Humanities. In 1979, she was nominated to Leadership Atlanta. Evans was appointed by President Clinton to the Commission on White House Fellows.

Play Like A Man Win Like A Woman

  • Gail Evans is the best selling author of Play Like A Man Win Like A Woman, an informative business guide to the secrets men know about success that women need to learn. The book was listed for several months on the New York Times, Business Week, and Wall Street Journal's bestseller lists. She has appeared in the past year commenting on the phenomenal success of her debut book in such outlets as, NBC's The Today Show, USA Today, the Larry King Live Show, and the New York Times to name a few.

Playing to Change

  • Once you learn the rules, incorporate the ones that work for you and not the others. If you choose not to play by them, compensate, but be aware of the rules. Don't play in ignorance. Knowing these rules doesn’t turn women into men, says Ms. Evans. It allows women to use their own skills -- to be smart, thoughtful and relationship-oriented. Integrity need not be lost, Ms. Evans hastens to add. Take what you are and don’t try to become somebody else.

    Feminization of the workplace has been much heralded in books and magazines, says Ms. Evans, but she hasn’t seen it. What she does see is stereotypes which continue to have a fast hold on most of the business world. And, she says, she’s lived through most of them. Not being straight forward acknowledging this reality troubles her.

    How did it come to pass that most men know how to function in the work world and most women don’t? Ms. Evans believes it goes back to how we were acculturated. This is not a new theory, she assures us, but it is what she has observed through a lifetime of working inside politics and business. For the most part, men think the object of the game of business is to win. Women, in her experience, are more likely to focus on keeping the game going, keeping relationships working, keeping everyone involved. These two very different perspectives on life, she has found, have a profound affect in the workplace.
     
 
 
 

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